Always Something To Be Thankful For – No Bones About It by guest blogger, Vi Shaffer

Yes, times are tough right now. But there is always something to be thankful for.
So, on this Thanksgiving, why not give thanks for everything you have – regardless
of how little – instead of dwelling on what you don’t have? If you are missing
someone or something, be thankful they, or it, are or have been a part of your
life. Among the things to be thankful for, many people include their dogs or other
pets. Nevertheless, some people don’t like dogs for whatever reason(s) they may
have. But an individual doesn’t have to be a “dog person” to be kind to them and
recognize and appreciate all the ways they contribute to human welfare. Just
think of the service animals, detection dogs, patrol dogs, cattle and sheep dogs,
search dogs, and those dogs who give comfort or alleviate the loneliness of
others.

Yes, dogs come with needs, as does every living thing. Along with food, shelter,
and affection, caring for your dog includes protecting them from harmful things.
That brings up the double usage of “no bones about it” in my column heading.
Not all bones, whether cooked or uncooked, are good for dogs – especially bones
from turkey, chicken, and other fowl. Those types can cause choking, indigestion,
or obstructions in their digestive system, or worse – splinter and perforate the
dog’s organs.

As difficult as it is for some to ignore those sweet pleading eyes of a pooch while a
Thanksgiving meal is being prepared or served – don’t give in to them. Giving in to
their wants of nibbles may be unhealthy, and counter-surfers can be sneaky and
grab things they shouldn’t have. So be wary. However, you can include your dog
in the festivities with a Thanksgiving dinner – only not one the same as yours.
Instead, give them a plate with small amounts of boneless white turkey meat,
unseasoned potatoes, and vegetables – but no onions or stuffing/dressing. For
those dog lovers who want to give them dessert too – a small amount of
unseasoned pumpkin is good for them – but not that spiced pie filling, and do not
give them chocolate, things that have a lot of sugar – or anything that contains the
artificial sweetener Xylitol. Xylitol can be deadly for your dog!
Afterward, it might be tempting to scrape the scraps off all the plates into your
dog’s food dish – don’t. That also pertains to adding dark meat, the skin of the

turkey or chicken, or rich gravy to their kibble. Although your dog will gobble it up
and enjoy every bite – too much fat can cause stomach pain and digestive issues –
possibly serious pancreatitis.

Remember to emphasize to your family members and guests, including children,
the dangers of giving your dog unsafe food.
It’s easy to be distracted by everything going on in your household, so if children
are present, for safety, it is wise to ask a specific person to keep an eye on them –
especially since kids tend to run in and out of the house playing. You don’t want
to spend your afternoon worried, walking or driving around looking for your pet
that escaped because someone left the door open – or got out of the yard
because it was frightened by all the commotion. It is also important that guests
who bring their dog make sure it is wearing a collar with contact information. If
possible, have them include your contact number if they are from out of town.
Too many dogs manage to get out and become lost when visiting at this time of
year.

In addition, children playing with your dog need watching so they don’t do
anything that will possibly hurt the dog or make the dog snap at them or worse.
And speaking of snapping – arguments have erupted between family members
and friends because of so many opinions in one place. From family matters to
football to politics – raised voices may put your dog in a protective mode,
believing you are being threatened. If that occurs, it’s wise to put your dog in
another room or his kennel where he is away from the ruckus and will feel safe.
That way, you can partake in the “discussions” or scream and cheer without
worry, and your dog will be relieved from the noise. Happy Thanksgiving.