Do cats respond to their name?

Professor Toshikazu Hasegawa from the University of Tokyo with Atsuko Saito, Ph.D., who is currently an associate professor at Sophia University in Tokyo conducted a study to see if cats recognize their own name. The researchers felt that since cats are not as social as dogs and other mammals, that they may not respond to their name the way more social mammals do.

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What they found is that cats do respond to their name if their owners use the cat’s name often. It is interesting that previous research has shown that cats do distinguish between their owner’s voice and a stranger’s voice, can follow a person’s pointing finger to find hidden food, and may change their behavior depending on their owner’s facial expressions.

In my experience I have successfully taught my cats to come when called, sit and stay and do other things. This required that they understand and respond to their name as well as other words. I am glad that some researchers are looking into ways to validate the intelligence and abilities of cats. As for cats not being social in my experience some are very social, and some are not so social. I have owned cats that behaved more like dogs than cats. More research needs to be done.

Cats seem to be able to understand the laws of physics

Researchers from Kyoto University in Japan led by Saho Takagi published their findings in Springer’s journal, Animal Cognition. In previous tests, researchers determined that cats can determine the location of invisible items based on their hearing alone. The latest study showed that cats responded to articles dropped from a container more when the container was shaken and made a rattling sound then they did to containers that had an object in them but did not make a rattling sound.

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“Cats use a causal-logical understanding of noise or sounds to predict the appearance of invisible objects,” say Takagi. Since many cat’s hunt in low-light situations, this is a necessary association for them. This is one step closer to understanding the abilities of cats.

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160614114410.htm