Clicker Training a Cat

Yes, cats can be trained. This article will explain why you should train your cat. Since it would take a whole book to explain the detailed steps about how to clicker train your cat, I suggest that you google clicker training for cats and get a book.

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Photo caption: “You want me to do what?”

Why would a cat owner want to train their cat? There are a lot of reasons. First, it can give you control over your cat. Imagine if you have taught your cat to get into his carrier, how much easier it would be to do that. Cats like the stimulation that learning gives them. Teaching your cat tricks also deepens the bond between you and your cat. It encourages your cat to exercise. It gives the cat mental stimulation. Clicker training your cat also gives you a tool to use if your cat develops a behavior problem so that you can correct the problem.

The first step to clicker training a cat is to find the special treat that your cat likes. Keep in mind that a treat is not a meal, so it will be small. You will have to experiment with people food as well as various cat treats to find the one your cat loves. The treat has to be something that you can handle easily and either comes in a small size or can be cut into tiny pieces. You do not want a treat that the cat must stop and chew for a few minutes. It should be one that the cat can easily eat quickly.

Often people do not realize that there are different clickers that range from loud to soft clicks. I suggest that you use a soft click for a cat. You can also use a click type pen, but it is not as easy to use as a clicker.

You also need a target stick and instead of buying an expensive one, you can use a ¼” dowel that is found in hardware stores, stores that carry lumber or craft stores.

Once you have all the equipment that you need, you can start working with your cat. Start slowly, getting the cat used to the clicker. Once the cat understands that the clicker is a signal for a treat, you can start teaching the cat simple commands. You can have a few sessions in a day but be sure to keep the training sessions very short. Cats get bored quickly. It is important that you work with your cat in a quiet environment. Your cat must be relaxed and feel safe. If you have more than one cat or a dog, be sure to train your cat alone in a room where the other animals cannot get in. If you have more than one cat, only work with one at a time. It can help if you have a different clicker for each cat, it will help them understand that you are clicking only them.

The last bit of advice that I have for you is be patient and don’t give up. Initially older cats may slow to respond, but they too should be taught tricks. Have fun, you cat will.

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Declawing a cat

Some people feel that they must declaw a cat in order to save their furniture, rugs and curtains. However, they fail to realize that declawing a cat is not the same a trimming their nails. It involves removing the end bone and claw on each of the cat’s toes. This is a painful procedure and the cat will need care and pain medications to recover. Many veterinarians will not declaw a cat.

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Declawing a cat will also take away the cat’s main defense mechanism. While you may feel that your cat will be an indoor cat, during the cat’s lifetime, he may accidently get outside and will be almost defenseless.

Scratching is a normal behavior for a cat. They mark their territory and sharpen their nails by scratching. It seems that they also enjoy the activity.

Rather than declaw a cat, you can teach a cat to use a scratching post. Provide a scratching post in the places the cat likes to scratch. If the cat starts to scratch furniture, simply say no and move the cat to a scratching post. They are capable of learning where to scratch. Clicker training can help a cat learn to use a scratching post.

There are different types of scratching posts for cats. Experiment with them to see which one appeals to your cat. Some of the types of scratching posts are ones made from rug, natural wood and cardboard like substance.

It is easier to train a young cat than an older cat, but the main thing is to not give up. With the right scratching post and encouragement, your cat will learn.

If you do consider declawing, consult with your veterinarian first to see what is involved in the procedure as well as the care that the cat will need after. It is always easier to declaw a young cat. Declawing an older cat or one that has medical issues can be riskier and cause health problems.